COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

(Click on the question below to view the answer/response.)

Do I need to wear double masks?

For now, no. Health Canada’s recommendation remains the same.

Media have ran articles discussing the idea that the public should consider double masking. The double-masking advice from the US appears to advocate for wearing an N95 mask underneath a medical grade surgical mask. Wearing two non-medical masks over top of each other may cause discomfort, leading people to handle the masks more and may result in poor placement over the mouth and nose. Currently, Canadian health authorities have NOT changed their guidance regarding mask usage and recommend people wear a single, non-medical face covering when out in public. When choosing a mask, look for ones with the following attributes:

  • Choose a mask made of 3 layers
  • 2 layers should be tightly woven material fabric, such as linen or cotton
  • The third layer should be a filter-type fabric, such as a non-woven polypropylene fabric
  • Choose a mask that is large enough to completely and comfortably cover the nose, mouth, and chin without gaping
  • Masks should allow for easy breathing
  • They should be able to fit securely to the head with ties or ear loops
  • They should be comfortable and not require frequent adjustments
  • Masks should be changed as soon as possible if they become damp or dirty
  • Masks should maintain their shape after washing and drying

Avoid purchasing masks with valves as these will permit more respiratory droplets to bypass the mask. Ensure that when you touch your face, adjust your mask, or take off your mask, proper hand hygiene is performed. Masking guidance can be found here.

Close Contacts

Please contact the event organizer. You can work with the event organizer to support the event organizer in notifying other people who attended the event at same time as you. For events with 10 or more individuals the organizer or instructor will notify contacts.

Your close contacts are anyone who you were in close contact with (see the above definition) during your infectious period, which is the time that you can spread COVID-19 to others. Your infectious period is different if you have symptoms or not.

For a person with COVID-19 who has symptoms, the infectious period is 48 hours before the start of until 10 days after the start of their symptoms. For some people this may be longer. See Isolation and Quarantine for more information.

For a person with COVID-19 who had no symptoms when they were tested, the infectious period is 48 hours before they had their test done, to 10 days after the date of their test (if they remain symptom free). If the person develops symptoms after having their test, they are infectious to others for the duration of their symptoms. For most people, this is until 10 days after the start of their symptoms.

Isolation and Quarantine
  • Isolation generally ends 10 days after your symptoms start, UNLESS you still feel sick. If you feel sick you need to continue to isolate. Your continued isolation past 10 days can end when you have gone 24 hours without a fever, without taking fever-reducing medications (e.g. Advil or Tylenol), AND your other symptoms have improved. Some symptoms such as fatigue and cough may last longer than 10 days, but do not require a longer isolation.
  • If you never develop symptoms, your isolation period ends 10 days after the date when your first positive COVID-19 swab was taken.
  • If you’ve been told by a health care provider that you have a weak immune system or you are immunocompromised, or you have been hospitalized for severe COVID-19, your isolation will usually end 14 days after your symptoms start as long as you have not had a fever within the last 24 hours, without taking fever-reducing medications, AND your other symptoms have improved.
  • If your fever continues past 14 days or your COVID-19 symptoms are getting worse call your health care provider or 811.
  • For a medical emergency, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department and tell them that you tested positive for COVID-19.
  • If you are a close contact of a person with COVID-19 you are legally required to quarantine for 14 days from the time you were last exposed
  • If you have returned from travel outside of Canada you are legally required to quarantine for 14 days
  • You must complete your 14 day quarantine, even if you receive a negative COVID-19 test result.
  • If you develop symptoms during your quarantine period, receive a positive COVID-19 test result, or have an additional exposure to someone with COVID-19 your quarantine may be extended.

Yes, you must continue to quarantine until 14 days after the last exposure to the case. The requirement for quarantine for close contacts or returned travelers applies regardless of any testing results. The only exception is if you are participating in the International Border Pilot Project where there are specific instructions for testing and quarantine.

No, you do not need to quarantine as long as the person who is a close contact of a confirmed COVID-19 case does not develop symptoms or has not tested positive for COVID-19.

If the person who is a close contact develops symptoms, you and the other members of the household are required to quarantine for 14 days.

  • Follow  How to Isolate and Quarantine.
  • The person who is a close contact should be tested for COVID-19. Please visit ahs.ca/testing for more information and to book a test or contact Stoney Health Services (403-881-3920).
    • If the person who is a close contact tests negative for COVID-19, the other household members are not required to quarantine as long as they themselves do not develop symptoms.

If the person who is a close contact tests positive for COVID-19, the other household members are required to quarantine for 14 days.

No, the State of  Local Emergency, declared by Nakoda Emergency Management on January 11, 2021, remains in effect. As long as the order continues, home visits and gatherings of any type are prohibited. This is regardless of COVID-19 status.