Public Health Measures Continue on Reserve July 1

Public Health Restrictions Continue in Morley

While the Alberta Government is removing most public health measures on July 1, a slower, more cautious, approach is being taken on the Stoney Nakoda First Nation in Morley

July 1 will see Alberta’s final stage of its Open for Summer plan kick off with the removal of public health measures, including a ban on indoor gatherings and the lifting of mandatory mask wearing in most indoor spaces.

While provincial restrictions are easing, in Morley and area all public health restrictions remain at level ‘Red‘ with a high risk of transmission. 

Restrictions, including mask wearing indoors, will remain in place until there is a decline in the community’s active COVID cases AND at least 70% of Nation members get vaccinated. Refer to image of Three Risk Levels to understand the requirements for each level.

The best decision for the community is for as many community members 12+ to get vaccinated. Encourage family, friends and clients to all do their part to help us #GetBackToNormal!

Îethka Îyarhe Wiyabi Empowerment Virtual Event

2nd Îethka Îyarhe Wiyabi Empowerment Event Goes Virtual

Gratitude. Togetherness. Love. Resiliency and Strength. Just a few of the words to describe the Îethka Îyarhe Wiyabi Empowerment Virtual event on June 23.

Gaining energy from a traditional drumming circle and powwow dancers captured on a video, the 2nd women’s empowerment event brought Stoney women – from far and wide – together to share, connect and get re-energized.

Elders Tina Poucette, Krista Hunter and Verna Powderface, along with keynote speaker Angela Young, shared their unique perspectives, wisdom and inspired participants. Drawing from their own experiences, each woman challenged those Zooming in to gain strength from their language, speak up and make a difference together in their roles as mothers, nurturers and ‘keepers of their teepees’.

 

After listening to the inspiring women, Michelle Nieviadomy led guests through a short meditation and offered a few self-care ideas we can all learn from: get moving, rest, drink water, put their phones down and connect with a good circle of friends who are encouraging, loving and supportive.

A few lucky guests also received some great prizes including jewelry, and all participants took home a wonderful door prize filled with several items to encourage their self care practices.

Thanks to all sponsors for their donations!

Donations

  • Door Prize: Michelle Wesley made and donated a set of earrings and headpiece.
  • Door Prize: Sage-Market Mall donated two essential oils. Diffuser provided by the Stoney Family Resource Network.
  • Gift Bags: Rocky Mountain Soap Company-Canmore donated bath and beauty products. 

Safety Corner: Extreme Heat Warning

Safety Corner: Extreme Heat Warning

Southern Alberta is in the midst of a heatwave that is expected to last at least until July 3rd. Daytime temperatures are forecasted to be near 36°C and overnight lows near 20°C. It is possible for a few communities in Southern Alberta to set new all-time record high temperatures.

During periods of extreme heat, everyone is at an increased risk, including your pets. These conditions can increase heat-related illness and increase the risk of fire and power outages.

Extreme Heat Warning

Message to the Community (click on image to make bigger).

Take precautions to keep you and your family safe

If planning to be outdoors

  • Keep yourself hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids like water or other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverage (about 1 cup for every 15-20 minutes that you’re in the heat). This the most important thing you can do to stay healthy and safe during a heat wave.
  • Apply a sunscreen of at least sun protection factor (SPF) 30, at least 20 minutes before heading outdoors. Be sure the SPF 30 screens out both UVA and UVB rays, and reapply frequently (as directed on product label).
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses (with a UVA/UVB CSA certified seal).
  • Wear light-coloured long-sleeved shirts and pants that cover skin.
  • Consider rescheduling outdoor activities to cooler hours of the day.
  • Take frequent breaks from heat, spending time indoors. If you are going to be indoors in a public building, such as a mall, be sure to respect and follow all COVID requirements, including physical distancing and considering masks.
  • Do not leave any person or pet inside a closed vehicle, ever.
  • Limit exposure outdoors. Stock up on key supplies such as groceries, medications, and drinking water to avoid the need to take extra trips outside.

Keep devices charged so you can communicate and stay informed in the event of a power outage

Ensure you have extra cooling options by freezing ice or ice packs, and chill water in spray bottles so you can cool yourself down.

Check that cooling appliances are in working order (fans, air conditioners) and have backup options that don’t require power (i.e. cold washcloths).

While it’s tempting to access public waterways such as the Bow River, please be mindful of the potential dangers of a strong current, debris, and visibility as the spring runoff is still occurring.

Monitor for symptoms of heatstroke

  • high body temperature
  • lack of sweat
  • disorientation
  • fainting
  • unconsciousness

If you require further information, please check out Alberta Health Services.

Public Health Notice: Tapeworm parasite on the rise

Public Health Notice for Alberta

Tapeworm parasite on the rise

Quick Facts

  • Parasite has the potential to cause fatal tumour in humans
  • There could be a number of people out there in the community incubating the disease
  • It’s been found in Saskatchewan and in B.C., but Alberta has had most of the cases

How can people get tapeworm?

The tapeworm eggs are tiny and you can’t see them. The most common ways of getting a tapeworm are:

  • Eating fruits and vegetables (commonly wild berries and herbs) that have touched the feces of an infected coyote, fox, dog, or cat.
  • Touching soil with tapeworm eggs in it (e.g., children playing outside and not washing their hands before eating).
  • Touching an infected pet or places in the home that could have been in contact with the pet’s feces.
  • Handling many animals (e.g., coyotes, foxes, dogs) as part of your job or hobby (e.g., trappers, veterinarians, veterinary technicians). 

What are the symptoms?

When a person eats the eggs, they may get cyst-like lesions in their liver. The lesions grow very slowly and may not cause any symptoms for years.

Symptoms 

  • pain or discomfort in the upper belly
  • weakness
  • weight loss 

How is it treated?

A tapeworm often causes death if it’s not treated. The treatment is medicine to fight the parasites and surgery to remove the lesions.

How can you prevent tapeworm infections?

The best ways to prevent tapeworm infections are to:

  • Practice good hand hygiene. Always wash your hands with soap and water after touching pets and soil and before touching food. Teach children that hand washing is important.
  • Wash fruits and vegetables very well before eating them.
  • Talk to your veterinarian about ways to prevent tapeworm infections in your pets.
  • Don’t let your pet wander and eat rodents.
  • Clean up feces from your pet as soon as possible (indoors and outdoors).
  • Some dogs roll in wild animal feces and can spread the eggs on their fur. Keep your pet clean.
  • Don’t touch a coyote, fox, or other wild animal (dead or alive), unless you’re wearing plastic, disposable gloves. 

Where can I get more information?

Source: https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Alberta/Pages/echinococcus-tapeworm.aspx

Public Health Notice (PDF download)

Message from the Medical Office of Health

Message from the Medical Office of Health

June 15, 2021
Dear Stoney Community Members,


This notice is to advise community members that we are very concerned about the high number of COVID-19 cases in Morley. If you have attended a public gathering such as a wedding, funeral, birthday party, organized event, etc. in the last 14 days, you may have been exposed to the COVID-19 virus. Indigenous Services Canada, Alberta Region (ISC-AB) is working closely with Stoney Health Services to ensure contact tracing can continue and testing is available to all of those at risk.


If you are experiencing signs and symptoms of COVID-19 such as a fever, cough, shortness of breath, nasal symptoms, loss of smell or taste, vomiting, diarrhea or are feeling unwell or unusually tired, please visit the Stoney Health Centre COVID-19 testing site at the Welsey Elder’s Lodge from 12:00pm and 3:30pm on Monday-Friday. It is important to get tested as early as possible as this is when people are the most infectious.

For a complete list of COVID-19 symptoms please visit www.albertahealthservices.ca/covid-19 or call Health Link at 811.

If you are experiencing difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, chest pain, confusion, then please call an ambulance by calling 911. The earlier people receive hospital care if it is needed, the better the outcomes.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms related to COVID-19 you MUST self-isolate for 10 days after the onset of symptoms, and until your symptoms are resolved (whichever is longer). Under no circumstances should you leave your property during self-isolation.

If you require assistance with food, water, cleaning supplies or medication delivery, please contact the Stoney COVID Line at 403-669-8511.

At this time, ISC-AB regional staff continue to work closely with Stoney Health Services to support increased testing and case management.

In order to limit the spread of COVID-19 we ask that all members please:

  1. Get Vaccinated! COVID-19 Vaccine is available for any Nation members over the age of 12 yrs, Vaccination Clinic at Stoney Health Center, walk-ins Monday-Friday from 11:00am-4:00pm.
  2. Immediately self-isolate and contact the health centre call 403-807-0622, if you have any symptoms of COVID-19.
  3. Wear a mask and practice good hand hygiene.
  4. Continue to avoid non-essential travel, limit contacts to your immediate household and do not attend any gatherings (indoor or outdoor).
  5. Please cooperate with contact tracers and your Stoney Health Services COVID-19 Response team if you are called. All your information will be kept private under the Health Information Act.

We understand that this is a difficult time but continued adherence to all public health guidelines is important in limiting the spread of COVID-19 and protecting the community. Full information on all current public health measures can be found on the Alberta Health website here: https://www.alberta.ca/enhanced-public-health-measures.aspx

The health and safety of Morley community members remains our top priority. We remain committed to working with leadership during this very difficult time.

Sincerely,

Dr. Chris Sarin, Deputy Medical Officer of Health, ISC-AB

Sacredness of Wiyabi Enaibi

Sacredness of Wiyabi Enaibi (SOWE) project

Eagle’s Nest Stoney Family Shelter launched the “Sacredhood of Women and the Moon” program in early May 2021. A joint initiative with the Mini Thni Crisis Support team.

Sacredness of Wiyabi Enaibi (SOWE) will offer women and girls on the nation monthly kits to support their moon cycle. Each kit will include a bar of natural soap, reusable and disposable hygiene products, and a rights of passage card written by Krista Hunter and contributing Elders.

The Sacredhood project celebrates the journey into womanhood and invites all Nation members to join.

For any Stoney Nakoda Nation member who would like a moon cycle kit, simply come to the gate at Eagle’s Nest and receive this offering. Each woman or girl will have the opportunity to receive one moon cycle kit per month! This is open to all women and girls on the Stoney Nation!

We are so grateful for the incredible donations we have already received for this project. If you are wanting to give to this project, you can do so by supporting a woman (or, however many women you would like!) by building moon cycle kits and dropping them off at our gate.

Each kit includes: a reusable bag, 15 tampons, 6 pads, 1 reusable pad or panty, and 1 natural bar of soap.

We love supporting Canadian companies. Here are some links to suppliers!

Follow the Eagle’s Nest Stoney Family Shelter on Facebook for details and updates.

Meet the Team: Family Resource Network

Meet the Team: Family Resource Network

In a new installment, we highlight Stoney Health Services’ teams and the friendly faces behind our programs. 

For May, we feature our Family Resource Network led by Denise Mitchell. Team includes Amanda Goodstoney, Lorraine Beaver and Laura Allen who all specialize in early childhood education and are experienced in offering programming that follows Stoney Nakoda traditional practices. The Family Resource Network welcomes all Stoney families and encourages them to reach out for further details.

Amanda Goodstoney, Family Support Worker

Amanda Goodstoney is a member of Stoney Nation and speaks the Stoney langue. She has three wonderful children and lives in Mînî Thnî and enjoys  attending powwows, listening to music, reading books and enjoying nature and the traditional harvest season. 

Amanda has worked for several years with families and other agencies coordinating community educational programs. In her current role as a family support worker with Stoney Family Resource Network, Amanda provides families and caregivers mentoring and support services with a goal to enhance parenting skills. She is trained and certified in the three different parent resources programs – Nurturing Parenting Model, Triple P Positive Parenting Model, ASQ, ACE’s- The function and development of the Brain.

She is comfortable teaching traditional parenting lessons with young parents and caregivers, and facilitates a variety of Community Educational Programs on topics such as, adverse childhood experiences, building positive relationship with your children, positive communication skills, budgeting and meal planning.

Lorraine Beaver, Home Visitation Worker

As a proud Nation member, Lorraine Beaver speak fluently with our Stoney Language and lives in Mînî Thnî. She may be a familiar face as she previously worked with the Stoney Health Head Start program, as a Morley Community School Culture teacher and the Wesley SCcyber E-learning Adult Upgrading. She has years of experience working with families, coordinating educational programs and teaching traditional culture programs.

In her role as a home visitation worker with the Family Resource Network, Lorraine provides support to parents, caregivers and families with children from infants to six years. She works closely with the Stoney Health Center to offer support, referrals and other resources. Her goal is to reach out and help families and their children reach their fullest lifetime potential for intellectual, social, emotional, physiological growth and maturation.  

Laura Allan, Early Years Facilitator

Photo to come.

Laura Allan, BCST, ELCC rejoined the community last year when she started working as an early years facilitator with the Stoney Family Resource Network. Previously she worked as the director of Wesley Childcare.

In Laura’s role, she advocates and facilitates the importance of early childhood education and healthy child development for Stoney families. She is available to offer support in any of the following ways:

  • Advocating on the behalf of children and family needs physically, emotionally, & mentally
  • Increasing protective factors for children by improving parenting knowledge & skills
  • Facilitating of Ages & Stages Questionnaires
  • Creating individual child milestone plans
  • Information & referrals to access resources and service delivery
  • Facilitating the Nurturing Parenting Program
  • Creating social connections for young children
  • Yethka Preschool Playtime
  • Creating father-child activities and events for connection
  • Planning and implementing holiday & seasonal celebrations
  • Arts & crafts

May is also Physiotherapy Month

May is also Physiotherapy Month

PHYSIOTHERAPY – What is it? How does it help?

Physiotherapists have specialized training in physical function, movement, and mobility. They are the movement experts of the health field and can help people manage pain, injury, or disability.

A pediatric physiotherapist works with kids under the age of 21 (even infants!) and is capable of helping in a variety of situations:

  • Physical development concerns in newborns (ex. flat head, tight neck, not rolling or crawling on time, walking on tip toes). 
  • Disabilities that can have an impact on physical function (ex. Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Autism, brain injury).
  • Equipment fitting such as wheelchairs, walkers, and crutches. 
  • Anatomical disorders that cause pain and/or loss of function (ex. hip dysplasia, scoliosis).
  • General pain and injury (ex. ankle sprain, back pain).
  • Healthy lifestyle promotion and getting kids active!

Like all health professionals, physiotherapists care about you and your well-being and will work together with other members of your health team to ensure that you are getting the best care possible. A good physiotherapist will make sure that you and your family understand your condition so that you are able to better help yourself and keep moving for life! 

Our local physio from Renfrew Educational Services, Trevor, is here to help support kids and families of the Stoney Nakoda Nation. All treatments are free of charge, and you do not need a doctor referral to see a physio! You can message us on Facebook with any questions you might have, or you can call/text our team cell phone at (403) 701-4181.

May is Speech and Language Month

May is Speech Therapy Month

To mark Speech Therapy Month, we introduce some of the faces behind our partners in health, Renfrew Educational Services Stoney Team. 

Meet the team. Shabnam is the speech-language pathologist and Erika, the resident speech-language pathology assistant. Together, they support families and children in developing their speech and language skills. 

What is speech and language therapy? How does it work, you ask? Great questions! A Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) is someone who works with all things communication! SLPs support the development of speech, language, and communication skills. In striving to create the best environment for a child’s health and well-being, they recognize no two children and families are alike. Speech-language pathologists collaborate with families, using a play-based approach, to provide services that are inclusive and meaningful. As a pediatric speech team, they work with kids up to 21 years old and offer all services free of charge and no referral is necessary. In fact, walk-ins are welcome! 

Pediatric SLP’s can support areas such as: 

  • Speech Sounds – Producing sounds clearly to help your child be understood when they communicate their message.
  •  Language and grammar skills – Increasing vocabulary, putting words together and using language in a socially appropriate way.
  • Understanding language – Helping children understand and process language in their environment. Learn skills like understanding basic concepts and following simple/complex direction.
  • Literacy Skills – foundational skills to encourage fluent reading.
  • Fluency/ Stuttering- Provide strategies and coaching to manage stuttering and disfluencies.
  • Speech and language assessments to help identify a child’s unique skills and abilities.
  • Provide support using alternative communication (communication devices, visuals)
  • Provide hearing screenings
  • Assist with feeding and swallowing concerns.
  • Developing play and social communication skills. 

The Renfrew team is available to support kids and families of the Stoney Nakoda Nation. Visit the 2nd floor of the Bearspaw Youth Centre, message them on Facebook, main line (403)-881-2775, or call/text the team cellphone at (403) 701-4181.

COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics

Stoney First Nations Vaccine Clinics

Getting vaccinated in one of the best and most effective ways of preventing the spread of COVID-19 and protecting our community’s most vulnerable. Many people shared their own personal reasons for getting vaccinated – some shared similar stories, while others had travel, connecting with family and getting back to normal at the top of mind. Check out this vaccine video series! 

Stoney Health Services hosted several vaccine clinics throughout April welcoming eligible community members to get first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Chiniki Councillor Jordie Mark

September Daniels

Deanna Goodstoney

Lionel Crowspreadhiswings

Shylance Twoyoungmen

Stoney Education Authority's Cherith Mark

Donna Eddison

Stoney Health Service's Wendy Thatcher

Virtual Round Dance: Honouring our Youth

Virtual Round Dance Apr1
Virtual Round Dance Apr1

Virtual Round Dance: Honouring our Youth

Enjoy a fun night of traditional drumming, singing, elder teaching & storytelling from the comfort of your home!

Broadcast live on YouTube, Facebook and Siktoge Ja-Radio 88.5FM

Featuring: Conlin P - Chiniki Lake, Rod H. - Eya Hey Nakoda, Grieves B - Stoney Park and more!

MC Johnny Powderface and Virtual Stickman Gabriel Young

April 1, 2021 at 6 pm Call, text or email to sing or more info : Gabriel Young (gyoung@stoneyhealth.com or 403-862-7789)

March 21-27: National Poison Prevention Week

Poison Prevention...It's in your Hands.

March 21-27, 2021, is National Poison Prevention Week. The Injury Prevention Centre (IPC), the Poison and Drug Information Service (PADIS), Alberta Health Services, and community partners from across Alberta are encouraging Albertans to take action to prevent poisonings from disinfectant, hand sanitizer, and household cleaner use which has increased due to COVID.

Key facts: 

  • In 2020, there was a 73% increase in calls to Alberta’s poison centre concerning disinfectants, hand sanitizers, and bleach.  And a 200% increase in calls concerning hand sanitizers. If you have a poisoning emergency, call PADIS at 1-800-332-1414.